Changing the Factory We Call School

Get Informed! Access the latest research and resources about the Authentic Learning Education Model!

Meet Dr. Lawrence Muganga

Author, Researcher, Policy & Strategy Advisor and Authentic Learning Enthusiast with the Vision to change the factory we call school.

Lawrence is an Author, Researcher, Authentic Learning Enthusiast, Policy & Strategy Advisor and Performance Management Specialist, based in Edmonton, Canada. He is a results-driven visionary with a stellar record of success providing sound policy advice, independent and well-thought-out analysis, clear and easy to read research products, developing and operationalizing strategies, programs and projects that engage and unite diverse visions, missions and organizations. Lawrence is skilled at identifying and explaining complex policy & strategy issues, researching contentious issues, creating compelling research products that support easy decision making and realization of vision, conducting independent analysis, providing cutting edge policy advice, and building high-performing teams enthusiastic about achieving organization goals and objectives. Lawrence has held positions in Canada, Ethiopia, and Rwanda focused on researching, planning, developing, implementing, and assessing policies that improve the quality of life for vulnerable populations.

Lawrence is a recognized and award-winning professional within the areas of public policy and program management, he has established a network of contacts with local, national and international constituent groups including universities, think tanks, research and policy institutes, governments, multi-national development agencies, non-profit organizations, and industry-leading corporations. Lawrence has recently written and published a must-read book that seeks to remedy the ills that have befallen the modern school system. In the book You Can’t Make “Fish Climb Trees”, Lawrence advocates for a cutting-edge educational paradigm known as Authentic Learning, which, in short, means realistic learning in a real-life context. It means breaking down the walls of the school and taking education into the community. It means producing a tangible product that society can use. It means teaching students the soft skills, such as communication, collaboration, problem-solving, and creativity, that will enable their success in the real world. Simply put, Lawrence is very authentic, analytical, collaborative, futuristic and success-oriented. Read More About Him

Featured Book

You Can’t Make “Fish Climb Trees”

Overcoming Educational Malpractice through Authentic Learning

More About The BOOK

In our rapidly changing global environment where learning methods, styles and access vary dramatically it is increasingly necessary to stimulate conversation around drastically revolutionizing education. In You Can’t Make a Fish Climb Trees: Overcoming Educational Malpractice through Authentic Learning author and scholar Lawrence Muganga advocates for educational transformation and exposes our archaic education systems modeled for nineteenth-century Europe, which has allowed governments and administrators to structure and deliver education as if it were an assembly line.

​The current model largely discounts students’ individual differences and natural abilities impacting their ability to transition from the classroom into the workforce. While he focuses on the need for more dynamic education models in Sub-Saharan Africa, Muganga establishes applications for the presence of Authentic Learning—where teaching happens in a student-centered environment filled with real-world applications—throughout the global community. Drawing from the research of educational experts worldwide, he advocates for the kind of revolutionized education model that would see students’ individuality used to empower them so that they can navigate their future and the workforce successfully.

Time to Change the Factory We Call School.

So how do we remedy the ills that have befallen the modern school system? The answer lies in a cutting-edge educational paradigm known as authentic learning, which, in short, means realistic learning in a real-life context. It means breaking down the walls of the school and taking education into the community. It means producing a tangible product that society can use. It means teaching students the soft skills, such as communication, collaboration, problem-solving, and creativity, that will enable their success in the real world that they live in.

Here is More Information About

You Can’t Make “Fish Climb Trees”

WHAT EDUCATION EXPERTS ARE SAYING ABOUT

YOU CAN’T MAKE “FISH CLIMB TREES”

“This is a must-read book for educators and everyone who cares about creating an education experience that is relevant to real-life and sticks with students for a lifetime.”

Prof. Ali A. Abdi, PhD University of British Columbia, Canada

“Using authentic examples based on his own experiences, Lawrence Muganga explains not only what authentic learning is, and why it is important for educators to facilitate authentic learning, but also provides practical information on how to implement authentic learning. A must read for postsecondary educators.”

Prof. Heather Kanuka, PhD University of Alberta, Canada

“This is a fantastic book that is refreshing and touches on almost every major aspects and challenges to education in the 21st Century. The book does a great job juxtaposing educational experiences in the west (Canada) and Sub-Saharan Africa. I am hoping and praying hard that it will turn out to be a best seller.”

Prof. Andrew Ojede, PhD Texas State University, USA

“He also genuinely understands that an authentic learning approach is the way of education’s future. His description of authentic learning as a living, breathing model of education sums up his great appreciation for this potent style of learning. Importantly, it also reveals his deep respect for genuine learning in this vast and interconnected world.”

Educator, Steve Revington Pioneer of Authentic Learning, Canada

Astounding Reviews for the book

YOU CAN’T MAKE “FISH CLIMB TREES”

​The current model largely discounts students’ individual differences and natural abilities impacting their ability to transition from the classroom into the workforce. While he focuses on the need for more dynamic education models in Sub-Saharan Africa, Muganga establishes applications for the presence of Authentic Learning—where teaching happens in a student-centered environment filled with real-world applications—throughout the global community. Drawing from the research of educational experts worldwide, he advocates for the kind of revolutionized education model that would see students’ individuality used to empower them so that they can navigate their future and the workforce successfully.

Research & Articles

Instructors’ Perceptions of Authentic Learning in the Pedagogical Approaches of Postsecondary Education in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Case for Uganda

Authentic Learning in Arrican Post-Secondary Education and The Creative Economy. 

Authentic learning is a branch of constructivism, a pedagogical approach that places the student at the center of the learning experience. This instructional model has undergone gradual adoption in first-world countries, with underdeveloped countries still struggling to implement a systematic approach for incorporating authentic learning in the classrooms. In the meantime, the global economy has evolved from an industrial, factory-based economy to one involving the manipulation of knowledge. Consequently, the implementation of authentic learning has assumed an increased importance within education systems around the world, especially at the post-secondary level, where instructors need to prepare new graduates for a modern, service-oriented workforce.  

The Importance of Hermeneutic Theory in Understanding and Appreciating Interpretive Inquiry as a Methodology

Abstract: In recent decades, qualitative research processes have gained respectability in the social sciences field. Among the different types of qualitative research, interpretive inquiry seeks to gain information from interview subjects and to analyze that information from the context of the participants. The concept of hermeneutics, which originated in Ancient Greece and gained popularity as a method of analyzing Biblical text during the 17th Century, has recently expanded its focus into several qualitative research areas. Hermeneutics not only represents a philosophy, but also a theoretical framework or methodological approach to research. This paper will demonstrate that as a framework and/or methodology, hermeneutics complements the aims of interpretive inquiry. Specifically, qualitative researchers employing hermeneutics can interpret the interview data by concentrating on three concepts: the whole-part relationship, interpretation, and language.  

Student-centred teaching the future of education

The teaching and learning experience in some institutions of higher learning is not very different from that in high school – for the largest part, according to Harriet Karungi, a third-year education student from Makerere University. “During lectures, the lecturer does most of the talking. Though they keep on asking questions to prompt students to engage in the discussion, sometimes students are not interested or did not read anything at all about what the lecturer is talking about,” she says.

Rwandan wins Canadian Innovation Award

A Rwandan national, currently living and working in Canada, Lawrence Muganga, was recently recognised by Alberta, a provincial government in Canada, for initiating and successfully managing a crime prevention project the Province.

Press Release

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